Lake Eufaula Fishing Report November 2017

Eufaula: Level: 2.3 feet below 190 full pool. Temp: High 70s. Clarity: Slight stain.

Bass: Guide Billy Darby reports, “November will present us with cold fronts, dramatic changes in barometric pressure, plus temps that act like a yo-yo. Fish and patterns will be here today and gone tomorrow. Three days of warm sunshine and little wind will put bass in the mouths of creeks chasing shad. Hydrilla will be a major player, especially the outside edges adjacent to deeper water where jerkbaits, wake baits, creature baits and Trick Sticks pulled slowly off the mat and letting it slow fall should work on pretty days. Dreaded-weather days will put you back out on drop-offs, ledges and deep points, tirelessly jigging a spoon or crawling a Carolina rig.” Guide Sam Williams reports, “The unusually hot weather has kept the summer pattern active. The shoreline cover is still holding good fish. The frog bite in this cover is good most of the day. The Mann’s Pigmy Frog has been a hot bait for my clients who enjoy a slow pattern. Shaky heads with a short black worm with a chartreuse tail will catch fish. The frog bite is catching bigger fish. The deeper fish are in the brushpiles in 18 feet of water and deeper. Large plastics and deep divers are working there. Cool weather and hunting season are just around the corner, so make your plans to spend quality time with your family on the water or in the woods. The memories you make will last a lifetime and beyond.”

Crappie & Hybrids: Guide Billy Darby reports, “The Eufaula crappie can be slaughtered by fishing minnows over brushpiles 15 to 20 feet. Find the active piles first with your Humminbird, and then drift over them or anchor nearby and cast. If you are going after hybrids, just watch for active surface feeding and birds circling and diving over the schools. Troll through with big-lipped deep divers or station over active area and jig spoons.”

Bream: Guide Sam Williams reports, “Bluegills are still on the flats and under brush on the banks. You can smell the fish on the flats when the wind is down. There are also gills in the pads. Drop your worm or cricket in the holes inside the cover.”

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